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  • This Lake Won't Go
  • Sumner Smith
  • farmpond

This Lake Won't Go

So the lake started leaking (who knew lakes could leak?) and we were sad.  On the bright side, it gives us the kick in the pants we need to update the overflow and drainage systems.  On the not-so-bright side we weren't exactly planning on doing that right now.   Plus we liked our lake with water in it.  But still, we were kind of ready to do it, and looking forward to having it done, and just waiting for the lake to drain all the way so we could get to the bottom of the drain pipes and see exactly what was going on and our contractor could finalize the plan and start work. 

Except the weirdest thing has happened - the lake won't go.  It was starting to get pretty low - low enough that we were thinking it was close to time to call all of our friends who like fish, because we are going to have a *lot* of fish ready for freezers as soon as this water drops all the way.  But instead we had a big storm two nights ago, and when I woke up the lake was back up several feet.  Which I guess makes me feel good about what's going to happen when it's time to fill it back up, but kind of stinks for the idea of getting the water out of there so that we can fix the drainage and get it started refilling in time for summer.  We're definitely more than half full again at this point, and it's been sort of leaking since mid December.  Soooo, not as efficient as one might hope.

Which means this weekend we're going to take matters into our own hands. I'm not quite sure what that means, in that we can't just pull the drain pipe over because we need to still be able to tie into or cap the pipe at the bottom.  But the stand pipe is so old and rusty that I'm pretty sure it isn't going to put up too much of a fight, so we'll start with making some bigger holes in it.  Sounds like the type of engineering plan an artist would make, right?  Still, that's what we're going with.

This whole thing is kind of funny.  A farm will teach you all sorts of things you didn't even know you didn't know.  Like who knew this winter was going to be filled with questions around "how do we get this leaky pond to leak faster?  And then what the hell do we do once it's gone??"  But I guess that's what keeps life interesting.  And I'll report back once we have answers to the second part - what we're going to do to actually fix it.  So far we have about 3 viable ideas from different people.  My paramount concern is not messing with the structural integrity of the dam, and I think we've got a plan that's going to accomplish that, so fingers are crossed. Now if we could just get rid of all of this water.

  • Sumner Smith
  • farmpond

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